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General Engineering Associations Career Listings in Canada

Engineering Employment in Canada

Employment and Careers in Canada

General Engineering job and career postings from professional engineering associations across Canada. Note, not all the General Engineering associations are listed. We only provide direct links to General Engineering associations that provide actual job postings.


General Engineering Associations that provide job postings.

  • Association of Consulting Engineers of Canada
    Founded in 1925, ACEC is the national association of consulting firms that provide engineering and other technology-based intellectual services to the build and natural environment. Member companies offer professional engineering services world wide to private sector and government clients. ACEC's mission is to promote and safeguard the business and professional interests of the Canadian consulting engineering industry in Canada and abroad. The Association's membership consists of approximately 600 independent consulting engineering firms and 11 provincial and territorial member organizations. Members range in size from single-person operations to multi-national companies. These companies operate in all provinces and territories - many of them internationally as well - and offer, collectively, 24 types of services in 193 specializations within the following 14 major economic sectors: Agriculture, Communications, Construction, Energy, Surveying, Transportation, Water Supply and Sanitation, Environment, Fisheries, Forestry, Geology and Geophysics, Industrial and Manufacturing, Mining and Metallurgy and Municipal Engineering.

  • Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information
    CISTI, the Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information, is one of the world's major sources for information in all areas of science, technology, engineering and medicine.

  • Canadian Coalition of Women in Engineering, Science and Technology
    The idea for the Alberta Womens Science Network (AWSN) was formulated at the Science Alberta Foundation conference held October 1992 in Calgary. Here, women from all over Alberta discussed the need for a network amongst Women in Science & Engineering groups in Alberta. By communicating and sharing resources, the groups would be helping each other to achieve common goals.

  • Canadian Society for Engineering Management
    The Canadian Society for Engineering Management (CSEM) had its beginnings as the General Membership of the Engineering Institute of Canada (EIC) representing those engineers who had no affiliation with the either civil, mechanical, electrical or geotechnical societies. In 1990, CSEM changed its mandate in order to focus on the needs of engineers in management.  Today, CSEM continues as one of the six constituent societies of the EIC.

  • Canadian Society for Senior Engineers
    The EIC is a federation of Ten Member Societies. 

  • Engineering Institute of Canada
    The EIC is a federation of Ten Member Societies. 

  • Innovation Management Association of Canada
    Canadian Advanced Technology Alliance (CATAAlliance) is Canada's leading, most influential and entrepreneurial technology alliance. It is committed to growing the global competitiveness of its members, 80% of which are currently active exporters.

  • National Research Council Canada
    NRC Expertise provides a direct link to more than 1700 men and women at the National Research Council of Canada who have scientific, technical and professional expertise in literally thousands of topics. Building on its reputation as a world leader in research and development, NRC is now working with industry, academia and other government departments to support economic growth through innovation in Canada.

  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada
    NSERC will help make Canada a country of discoverers and innovators for the benefit of all Canadians.

  • Networks of Centres of Excellence
    The NCE program fosters powerful partnerships between university, government and industry. Networks of Centres of Excellence funded by the program are designed to develop Canada's economy and improve the quality of life of Canadians.

  • Social Societies and Humanities Research Council
    The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) is an arm's-length federal agency that promotes and supports university-based research and training in the social sciences and humanities.

  • Association of Professional Engineers, Geologists and Geophysicists of Alberta
    Since 1920, APEGGA has been a vibrant and progressive self-governing association fulfilling the mandate given to it by the Engineering, Geological and Geophysical Professions (EGGP) Act. APEGGA registers, sets practice standards and determines disciplinary actions, when necessary, for its more than 41,000 members.

  • Association of Science and Engineering Technology Professional of Alberta
    ASET serves the public interest through certification and registration of Alberta's applied science, information and engineering technology professionals.

  • Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of British Columbia
    The Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of B.C. regulates and governs the professions under the authority of the Engineers and Geoscientists Act by setting and maintaining high academic, experience and professional practice standards for all members. Individuals licensed by APEGBC are the only persons permitted by law to undertake, and assume responsibility for, engineering and geoscience projects in the province of B.C..

  • Consulting Engineers of British Columbia
    The Consulting Engineers of British Columbia is a business organisation that represents and provides assistance to consulting engineering firms, rather than individual engineers, through corporate membership. CEBC members number nearly 100 firms across the province constituting a sizeable portion of the industry in BC. Member firms range from the sole proprietor to the large multinational corporation.

  • Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Manitoba
    To serve and protect the public interest by governing and advancing the practices of professional engineering and professional geoscience in accordance with The Engineering and Geoscientific Professions Act of Manitoba.

  • Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of New Brunswick
    APEGNB, therefore, is responsible for statutory services as required by the Engineering and Geoscience Professions Act, to safeguard life, health and property through qualified ethical conduct in professional engineering for the benefit of the public, and to a somewhat lesser degree, to provide services to the general membership to aid in professional development.

  • Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Newfoundland
    The Professional Engineers and Geoscientists Newfoundland and Labrador (PEG) is an organization whose mandate is regulating these professions in the public interest, as promulgated in the Engineers and Geoscientists Act of Newfoundland and Labrador. PEG has about 2,500 members and is accountable to the public through the provincial Department of Government Services and Lands.

  • Association of Professional Engineers of Nova Scotia
    Association of Professional Engineers of Nova Scotia is the licensing and regulatory body for the more than 4500 Professional Engineers and Engineers-in-Training practicing in Nova Scotia or on Nova Scotia Projects.

  • Consulting Engineers of Nova Scotia
    The Consulting Engineers of Nova Scotia is a business association of just over four dozen Nova Scotian firms representing more than 1200 employees in the business of consulting engineering and related services.

  • Professional Engineers of Ontario
    Professional Engineers Ontario licenses Ontario's 65,000 professional engineers, and sets standards for and regulates engineering practice in the province. It has a statutory mandate under the Professional Engineers Act to protect the public interest where engineering is concerned. Rigorously educated, experienced and committed to a Code of Ethics that puts the public interest first, licensed professional engineers can be identified by the P.Eng. after their names.

  • Association of Professional Engineers of Prince Edward Island
    The Association of Professional Engineers of Prince Edward Island operates under the provisions of the Engineering Profession Act, 1990, and the By-Laws and Code of Ethics of the Association. It has the legislated authority and responsibility to regulate the practice of engineering and to govern members, licensees, engineers-in-training and holders of certificates of authorization in accordance with the Act and By-Laws and Code of Ethics.

  • Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan
    APEGS is the licensing body which fulfils this mandate by ensuring high standards of engineering/geoscience practice and education in Saskatchewan, by setting high standards for admission into the profession.

  • Association of Professional Engineers of Yukon Territory
    The Association of Professional Engineers of Yukon is a self-governing body of Professional Engineers that regulates and governs the engineering profession in Yukon.



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